Categories
Marketing

Firm using Facebook to recruit in Toronto

I’ve grown a bit tired of Facebook lately. I think it’s because what originally was a torrent of friend additions has gradually slowed to a trickle. (I meet lots of new people through my job but I doubt they want the auditor on their Facebook!)

It seems I’m not the only one who is questioning the system, but for other reasons. The lack of openness is leading some to compare it to AOL.

But despite our misgivings, the beast continues to grow. My city, Toronto, is apparently the “capital of Facebook”:

As a city, we have more members than New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco combined. Thirteen per cent of Torontonians have signed up. We not only have more members than any other city – 670,038 as of this week – we have more groups within the site talking about the goings on of our town.

What does this mean? The value of Facebook to its members increases exponentially as more people join, and for Torontonians, the value of a Facebook account is much higher than it would be for someone from, say, Saskatoon (29,475 members).

I wrote about Facebook before and compared it to LinkedIn. In the post I linked to some accounting-specific Facebook groups, including one I’ll mention again today: Ernst & Young Toronto.

I searched Facebook for groups for Toronto accountants, and the search turned up nothing very good other than the above group. Why are no more accounting firms in Toronto taking advantage of the massive percentage of the population using the site?

Recruiters are taking advantage of the clustering of Toronto accountants, as this screen grab from the Chartered Accountants of Canada group shows.

How long before firms in Toronto realize the recruiting potential of Facebook, as Ernst & Young has?

Categories
Accounting Blogs

Impossible to hide

A comment by Dennis Howlett in one of his recent posts forms my inspiration:

I can only ever be the judge of what I think might work in a situation where I have incomplete information. I could be completely wrong. But that’s where the blog metaphor makes such a positive difference. It is impossible to hide in a blog. You get caught out sooner or later.

He was talking about being asked to recommend someone for a job in tech PR, but the sentiment is pretty close to my feelings about this blog, which recently turned a year old and is going stronger than ever.

I’ve never tried to come off as much of an expert – I have some knowledge and I’m eager to share it with anyone who will listen. I’m nearly a full-fledged CA, but the designation means that I have to keep learning, not that I’m done.

That’s the great thing about blogging. You learn by writing, by sharing your thoughts and reading others.

Anyway, I guess that quote made me think about why I like this blog, what I get out of it, and why I’ve kept on with it for just over a year now. Here’s to the next year!

Categories
Accounting

Quit today, get hired back tomorrow

A recent story by the AP highlighted an interesting byproduct of the CA shortage – employees who leave their job at accounting firms are being actively recruited back to rejoin their former firm. Seems employers have realized that more often than not in the accounting business employees leave to explore different career options but leave the door open to returning to public practice.

Audit senior manager Danica Dilligard left Ernst & Young LLP in 2003 after six years with the company. E&Y’s courtship began almost immediately. The E&Y partners she’d worked with called, saying, “Just wanted to make sure you’re happy. There’s always a home for you here.” She was invited to E&Y golf outings, where she played in a foursome with the partners. She was included in professional certification courses and welcomed at networking events.

Granted this is a senior manager we’re talking about, but I have seen it trickling down to just about every level, down to the lowliest junior. It’s smart though.

Categories
Profession

Accounting is prestigious

A recent Harris Poll has concluded that 47% of Americans see accounting as having “considerable to great” prestige, and another 40% of the population attributing “some prestige” to the profession. Although it isn’t clear whether you have to have a professional designation to be considered prestigious.

Firefighters, doctors and nurses are in the lead with a lot more respondents (63, 58, and 55% respectively) giving those jobs great prestige ratings. I guess that doesn’t really surprise me.

Dan at Tick Marks alerted me to the survey, and he’s got a good point: “The medium-low prestige rating may reduce the number of teenagers considering accounting as a career choice.” Friggin’ teenagers.

Categories
Auditing

Mapping out my clients after a year in public practice

I have been playing around with Windows Live Local lately, Microsoft’s competition for Google Maps.

GTA map of audit clientsI decided to map all the clients where I’ve been in the last year with my firm. For the blue ones I just had to search for the business name, but the red ones represent clients that I had to manually search for their address and add them because they didn’t show up in a business name search for whatever reason.

I thought it was pretty interesting to see it all laid out there. One client in Waterloo, an inventory count at a location in Guelph, a client in Burlington, one in Brampton, Pickering and Vaughan, a few downtown Toronto, the rest in Mississauga, Etobicoke and North York.