Categories
Auditing

Taking the wraps off materiality

Materiality is an important concept in auditing. The point of an audit is to certify the financial statements as being free of material misstatement. A material misstatement is one which would affect the decisions of a user of those statements.

This recent blog post at the VeraSage Institute, more known for their pioneering work in the area of value pricing for professional services firms than their work revolutionizing the audit report, brings up an interesting idea:

During a specific conversation on materiality and how it should be determined I suggested that maybe the first step to improving our audit reports would be to include the level of materiality used in performing the audit.

[…]

Would the reader of audited financial statements utilize and appreciate knowing the level of materiality used to test and determine the correctness and completeness of the associated financial statements?

I think it’s pretty clear that the answer is yes. I also think it would go a long way to closing the expectation gap when it comes to audited financial statements. It further emphasizes that an audit doesn’t mean 100% of transactions are examined, and that there is a level of acceptance for errors within the statements.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to me (with my limited experience) that much is done within the profession until it is mandated by the governing bodies or various governments. Going above and beyond what is required isn’t seen very frequently in terms of the disclosure in financial statements, either in the audit report or the explanatory notes appending the statements.

I don’t think it is entirely the auditor’s fault. The statements are still the responsibility of management, but it is the auditor who is in the unique position to make the suggestion to management that additional details would be helpful. For that matter, auditors need to start making the suggestion to their governing bodies as well.

We’re essentially in the business of ensuring that complete and useful information is provided, and this might be a situation where we aren’t doing a great job.

Categories
Auditing

Materiality in auditing

Materiality is a concept in auditing that attempts to set a dollar value guideline for the scope of evidence testing at the substantive level, analytical procedures, and to a lesser extent, controls testing.

According to Krupo:

“Materiality is the smallest misstatement of a company’s finances that would cause a person to change how they value the entity in question.”

That sums it up nicely. It’s really based on what’s important to someone with a stake in the financial health of the entity.

For audits of for-profit companies, materiality is usually based on a percentage of revenues or income (pre-tax). 1-2% of revenues or 5-10% of net income is the benchmark. In non-profit organizations, materiality is usually 1-2% of expenditures.