Solzhenitsyn on ethics

An inspiring quote from Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on ethics:

The main thing is never to act against your conscience, not to put your signature on documents you do not believe in, not to vote for those who you think should not be elected, not to approve decisions, not to applaud, not to pass on lies… not to pretend. Let your creed be ‘Let the lie come into the world, let it even triumph, but not through me.’

Back in Grade 11 English, I had to choose an author and read several of their books, and then do some kind of essay on their major themes and style. I chose Solzhenitsyn because I was fascinated with the Soviet Union.

Good advice to people in business: Don’t put your signature on documents you don’t believe in [electronic or otherwise]!

Light’s effect on integrity and honesty

Following an earlier post about how clean smells were correlated with more ethically minded decision making is this HBR post about good lighting encouraging the same thing:

In one laboratory experiment, we placed participants in a dimly or well-lit room and asked them to complete 20 math problems under time pressure. The participants received a cash bonus for every correct answer. Since we were interested in whether darkness affects cheating rates, we left it up to the participants to score their own work and to pay themselves from a supply of money they had received at the beginning of the study. While there was no difference in actual performance on the math problems, almost 61 percent of the participants in the slightly dim room cheated while “only” 24 percent of those in a well-lit room did. Eight additional fluorescent lights in the room where the study took place reduced dishonesty by about 37 percent.

They also performed the test based on the perception of lighting levels using sunglasses, and had similar results.

I anxiously await the results of a combination of smell and lighting!

But why stop there? What else in the sensory-ethics world can we adjust and test? Sounds? Tastes? Should we all be chewing mint gum every day and listening to waves crashing onto the shore?

The question is: could this be taken too far? How brutally honest do we want our co-workers to be with us? At least in the interests of getting along, perhaps some things are better left in the dark.

Top traits of an effective internal auditor

The President of the IIA shares what he sees as the top seven attributes of an effective internal auditor, and in general I agree, with a few distinctions.

The most important attribute is referred to as business acumen, but the description that accompanies it has more to do with having an in-depth knowledge of the business the auditor works for. Splitting hairs I guess, but acumen is the ability to make good decisions and exercise sound judgment. A strong understanding of what is driving the success of the business is important to cultivate, as is staying on top of developments within the industry in which it operates. I think both are important, but one is easier to develop than the other.

Communication skills come next, and I would broaden that to be people skills in general. The ability to read people and adapt to any given situation and personality is very helpful, so both the outward skills like communicating clearly and succinctly and the inward skills like listening actively and processing information quickly will come in handy when dealing with people within the organization.

Integrity comes in at 3rd, and is critical to establishing and maintaining your reputation as a professional. Being consistently honest and forthright in your interactions with your “customers” will allow you to build strong working relationships across the business.

Experience is next, and it’s not a subject I feel especially qualified to discuss, since I’m only in my third year as an internal auditor, sixth as an auditor. What I will say is that each day I strive to learn and get better at my job, and working with staff that have, among them, decades more experience than I provides a constant reminder of the value of that experience.

Number five on the list is a solid grasp of business risks, which to me means the exact same thing as the first item. Let’s just put them both together at the top and shorten the list to six, shall we? After that is talent development skills, which is important to have once you reach a certain level and have people reporting up to you. I could make the case that this is essentially a subset of people skills.

Last (but not least in my opinion) is courage and that’s important for auditors whether they’re external or internal. Part of the job is being the bearer of bad news and you’ve got have the stones to deliver it straight!